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    The Interstitial Arts Foundation is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to the study, support, and promotion of interstitial art: literature, music, visual and performance art found in between categories and genres – art that crosses borders. Find out more!

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    IAF INTERFICTIONS ONLINE INDIEGOGO CAMPAIGN ends above target goal

    Thanks to 277 generous backers for our Interfictions Indiegogo Campaign, we raised $10,318 by the time our campaign ended at midnight, July 14th, 2014.  When we launched on June 3rd, we were staggered to find donations doubling almost daily, until after about 3 weeks we had reached our original target goal of $8,500, and were able to move on to our Stretch Goal of $10,000.

    Which means we not only get to publish Interfictions Online for another year, but we can pay our contributors at higher rates now, rates more in line with the effort and talent that innovation requires. Thank you, each and every one of the 277 generous donors who stepped forward to say that interstitial art is valued and valuable. The number of people is as important as the number of dollars raised. We are awed by your generosity.
    Now [...]

    INTERFICTIONS issue #3 is up online!

    The editors of Interfictions Online are happy to announce the birth of the journal’s latest issue, on May 22, 2014!

    The Spring 2014 issue’s non-fiction offerings include Mark Craddock’s poignant collage in Aerial Acrobatics and Gender Reassignment Surgery – A How-To Guide, while Inda Lauryn’s Parallels and Transitions splices analysis of contemporary female vocalists into a graduate school memoir. Isabel Yap’s Life Is Not a Shoujo Manga speaks for itself. And in an interview with Jeff VanderMeer and Jeremy Zerfoss, the two creators discuss their illustrated guide to writing, Wonderbook.

    The fiction offerings remix tropes from ghosts to automata, with new work by Richard Butner, Su-Yee Lin, Kat Howard, Tade Thompson and S. Craig Renfroe Jr.

    Several of the poems in this issue reimagine older narratives: Sridala Swami’s AI Winter draws on the Mahabharata, Sonya Taaffe’s Double Business on Hamlet, and Mary Alexandra Agner’s Hypothesis Between Your Ribs on the brief life of Charles Darwin’s daughter.

    [...]

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  • ≡ Delia Sherman
    dsherman_small
    Delia Sherman was born in Tokyo, Japan and brought up in New York, New York. She spent much of her early life at one end of a classroom or another, first at Vassar College and Brown University, where she earned a Ph.D. in Renaissance Studies, and then at Boston University and Northeastern, where she taught Expository Writing and Fantasy as Literature.

    This life of reading and teaching led, as it often does, to committing Fiction on her own account. She began with short stories, then moved up through novellas to her first novel, the Queer/Chaucerian fantasy Through a Brazen Mirror (1988). Her second novel, The Porcelain Dove (1992), an Interstitial work best described as a romantical–fantastical–historical comedy, was awarded the Mythopoeic Award. The Fall of the Kings, an Interstitial historical-academic-mythic tragedy set in an invented city, was written in collaboration with partner Ellen Kushner and published in 2002. Her short fiction has appeared in numerous volumes of The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror and has been translated into French, Italian, and Japanese. She has also contributed stories to a number of young people’s anthologies, most recently Coyote Road (2007) and Troll’s Eye View (2009). She has written two novels for younger readers: Changeling (2006) and The Magic Mirror of the Mermaid Queen (2009), which are set in an alternate New York populated by all the fairies and folklore the mortal immigrants brought with them when they came here.

    In 1995, she finally abandoned the fading groves of academe and put her skills to good use as a contributing editor for Tor Books and co-editor on the fantasy anthologies The Horns of Elfland (with Ellen Kushner) and The Essential Bordertown (with Terri Windling), as well as Interfictions 1 (with Theodora Goss) and Interficitons 2 (with Christopher Barzak). But she still misses the classroom, and has served on the faculty of the Clarion and Odyssey Science Fiction and Fantasy workshops, as well as teaching and lecturing at writing workshops all over the country.

    Sherman shares a sprawling Upper West Side apartment in New York City with Ellen Kushner and piles of books and papers. She loves airplanes, hotels, and unfamiliar places, gardening, and researching in brick-and-mortar libraries. She looks upon the country as a nice place to visit, but she is unable to contemplate life without cafés (where would she write?) and public transportation (she hates to drive).