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    IAF INTERFICTIONS ONLINE INDIEGOGO CAMPAIGN ends above target goal

    Thanks to 277 generous backers for our Interfictions Indiegogo Campaign, we raised $10,318 by the time our campaign ended at midnight, July 14th, 2014.  When we launched on June 3rd, we were staggered to find donations doubling almost daily, until after about 3 weeks we had reached our original target goal of $8,500, and were able to move on to our Stretch Goal of $10,000.

    Which means we not only get to publish Interfictions Online for another year, but we can pay our contributors at higher rates now, rates more in line with the effort and talent that innovation requires. Thank you, each and every one of the 277 generous donors who stepped forward to say that interstitial art is valued and valuable. The number of people is as important as the number of dollars raised. We are awed by your generosity.
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    INTERFICTIONS issue #3 is up online!

    The editors of Interfictions Online are happy to announce the birth of the journal’s latest issue, on May 22, 2014!

    The Spring 2014 issue’s non-fiction offerings include Mark Craddock’s poignant collage in Aerial Acrobatics and Gender Reassignment Surgery – A How-To Guide, while Inda Lauryn’s Parallels and Transitions splices analysis of contemporary female vocalists into a graduate school memoir. Isabel Yap’s Life Is Not a Shoujo Manga speaks for itself. And in an interview with Jeff VanderMeer and Jeremy Zerfoss, the two creators discuss their illustrated guide to writing, Wonderbook.

    The fiction offerings remix tropes from ghosts to automata, with new work by Richard Butner, Su-Yee Lin, Kat Howard, Tade Thompson and S. Craig Renfroe Jr.

    Several of the poems in this issue reimagine older narratives: Sridala Swami’s AI Winter draws on the Mahabharata, Sonya Taaffe’s Double Business on Hamlet, and Mary Alexandra Agner’s Hypothesis Between Your Ribs on the brief life of Charles Darwin’s daughter.

    [...]

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  • Nov. 19th! Jeff VanderMeer at MIT
    by Geoffrey | November 18th, 2009 |
    Jeff VanderMeer

    One of the IAF’s frequent collaborators and fellow travelers, the novelist, anthologist and cross-media storyteller Jeff VanderMeer, is coming to the Boston area give a free, open-to-the-public talk as part of MIT’s Comparative Media Studies Colloquium lecture series! The anthologist, essayist, NPR commentator and Booktour.com CEO Kevin Smokler will lead the Q&A session.

    Booklife

    Jeff is currently on tour supporting his new book Booklife, which he describes as “a unique writing guide to sustainable careers and sustainable creativity, the first to fully integrate discussion of the role of new media into topics that have always been of interest to writers”. I just finished reading my copy this afternoon and I can personally testify that it’s full of a wide range of great stuff. Jeff splits the book into two distinct sections, one on the author’s Public Booklife (marketing, PR, social interactions and other public engagements) and Private Booklife (the actions, philosophies, emotions and other internal struggles of the actual act of writing) and both halves – plus the appendices – are packed with thoughtful insights and useful advice. For example, how do writers deal with envy – and what does Francis Bacon have to say about that? To steal a line from an old tomato sauce commercial, “It’s in there!”

    Also worth noting: back in 2003, Jeff penned an essay for us which can currently be found in the Essays section of this very site, “Sudden Hummingbirds, Sudden Dislocations: The Interstitial Experience“. Here’s a quick excerpt from that piece:

    Sudden hummingbirds. Sudden dislocations of the senses on a reef at night. The convulsive beauty that sets us free by allowing us to see with new eyes. These were two moments in which I was caught between – I stood between the real and the unreal. In both cases, the world had revealed the something of the mystery beneath its usual facade of normalcy. This is what the interstitial means to me – the epiphany that comes from breaking through to someplace different and not quite mapped. It is a quality that carries over to my fiction – fiction that is not autobiographical in subject, but is autobiographical in spirit.

    Although Jeff’s lecture is not an official IAF event, interstitially-minded folks of all stripes are encouraged to attend! The book is primarily about the writing life, but Jeff will also be discussing his experiences with transmedia storytelling, including soundtracks, movies and alternate reality games; how print-on-demand is being used in creative experiments; and how artists must search out the balance between their public and private lives.

    Here’s the rundown:

    Booklife: The Private and the Public in Transmedia Storytelling and Self-Promotion
    Jeff VanderMeer with Kevin Smokler

    Fictional experiments in emerging media like Twitter and Facebook are influencing traditional printed novels and stories in interesting ways, but another intriguing new narrative is also emerging: the rise of “artifacts” that, although they support a writer’s career, have their own intrinsic creative value. What are the benefits and dangers of a confusion between the private creativity and the public career elements of a writer’s life caused by new media and a proliferation of “open channels”? What protective measures must a writer take to preserve his or her “self” in this environment? In addition to the guerilla tactics implicit in storytelling through social media and other unconventional platforms, in what ways is a writer’s life now itself a story irrespective of intentional fictive storytelling? Examining these issues leads naturally to a discussion on the tension and cross-pollination between the private and public lives of writers in our transmedia age, including the strategies and tactics that best serve those who want to survive and flourish in this new environment. What are we losing in the emerging new paradigm, and what do we stand to gain?

    A writer for the New York Times Book Review, Huffington Post, and Washington Post, Jeff VanderMeer is also the award-winning author of the metafictional City of Saints & Madmen, the noir fantasy Finch, and Booklife: Strategies & Survival Tips for 21st-Century Writers. His website can be found at jeffvandermeer.com.

    Kevin Smokler is the editor of Bookmark Now: Writing in Unreaderly Times (Basic Books) which was a San Francisco Chronicle Notable Book of 2005. His writing has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, the San Francisco Chronicle, Fast Company and on National Public Radio. He lives in San Francisco, blogs for the Huffington Post and at kevinsmokler.com, and is the CEO of BookTour.com.

    Presented in conjunction with Futures of Entertainment 4.

    The event is, again, free and open to the public. It begins at 5 PM, runs until 7, and is going down at room 4-231 (building 4, room 231) on the MIT campus. Parking on-campus is a little wonky, but there are multiple parking garages around; a better bet is likely to take public transportation. The Red Line in Boston comes straight to Kendall Square, which is right on the edge of the MIT campus. The lecture location is only a few minutes’ walk from there.

    5 o’clock PM on Thursday, November 19th, in room 4-231 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology – I’ll see you there!

    finish line

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